Day of Doing – Journalism Education Association

July 31, 2015
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Summer Journalism Workshop Coverage

Summer Journalism Workshop Coverage

 “I am a traditional print teacher, and I took a video broadcast workshop this summer.  This is my first ever script writing, stand-up, voice over, interviewing with a camera, and editing project — EVER.”  -Michelle Harmon, MJE – Boise, Idaho

July 31, 2015
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Student remembers World War II hero at Normandy

Student remembers World War II hero at Normandy

As she stands in the National American Cemetery in Normandy, France, Sparkman High School student Erin Stender delivers the eulogy she wrote to honor Capt. Malcolm A. Smith.

As she stands in the National American Cemetery in Normandy, France, Sparkman High School student Erin Stender delivers the eulogy she wrote to honor Capt. Malcolm A. Smith.

By: Erin Coggins, MJE

Journeys are a part of life. Capt. Malcolm A. Smith began his journey into World War II as a West Point cadet, eventually ending his journey as a casualty of war. Seventy years later, Sparkman High School student Erin Stender began a journey of her own that will connect the two forever.

Smith, from Birmingham, Ala., was a lively student at Auburn University when his appointment to West Point was announced in 1937. It was his father’s dream and one he believed he could make his own.

“Uncle Mac was not a great math student and that always worried him about going to West Point and he struggled in math there,” niece June Mack said.

Nevertheless, Smith completed his studies and graduated from the Academy. This achievement would help him earn the rank of captain in the United States Air Corps as America entered World War II in 1941. He became a pilot in the 368th Fighter Group in the European Campaign.

Stender, encouraged to apply for the National History Day’s Albert H. Small Normandy Scholars Program, was not expecting to be selected.

“Mrs. Coggins gave me a beret as a gift to let me know I had been selected. It took a few minutes for me to make the connection. I was shocked,” Stender said.

The scholars in the program are required to locate a silent hero from World War II buried in the National American Cemetery in Normandy, France. They were to research the silent hero and deliver a eulogy at the gravesite while continuing their studies in Normandy. Faced with a time crunch, Stender simply picked Smith’s name from a list of Alabamians buried in the National American Cemetery.

“I was running out of time to turn in the name I intended to research. Smith is a common name and at first I thought it may be difficult to find information on him, but I went with my initial feelings,” Stender said.

And the journey began.

Stender began researching Smith on various sites like ancestry.com and the National Archives. She was finding tidbits of information, like a marriage certificate and military service until a simple Google search.

“Mrs. Coggins was doing a Google search to help me one night and came upon a link about a documentary on Capt. Smith. It turned out that his niece, a professor at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, produced and filmed it. We had a name and a location so we emailed her,” Stender said.

Stender met with Smith’s niece, June Mack, in Birmingham where she was able to read through letters written by Smith as well as other items. Mack had found the letters in her mother’s belongings after her mother had passed away.

“My favorite was his childhood diary. He loved rabbits and I really got the feeling that he was a lively personality,” Stender said. “It was also the first time that June had seen these items. It was just special.”

The story Stender discovered was remarkable.

Capt. Malcolm A. Smith’s Story

On May 21, 1944, Smith went on a bombing run of railways in the French countryside. He did not return.

“In my research, I found so many statements that said his fellow pilots were so upset because “Smitty” did not return. He was a good person,” Stender said.

Smith faced with crashing into the small village of Vibraye, killing innocent civilians, decided to crash into a nearby pasture. The villagers considered him a hero and quickly set to work making a proper grave.

In 1945, after the war, a solider from Brooklyn was patrolling in Vibraye when a French lady came up to him, pushing a ring into his hand. She was excited.

“He couldn’t speak French so he finally found someone to translate. The lady was telling him to take the ring. He discovered it was a West Point class ring and that it had a name engraved on it,” Stender said. “When he got back to the States he located the Smith family in Birmingham to let them know what he had in his possession. It was then that the family knew Malcolm was no longer missing in action. He was moved to the American Cemetery at Normandy for a final resting place. ”

In 2004, the Smith family was invited to Vibraye to celebrate the naming of one of their streets—Capt. Malcolm A. Smith Way.

Ending the Journey

Stender traveled to France with 14 other Institute teacher-student teams in late June. While there, she was able to walk Utah and Omaha beaches and brief the team on bomber escorts while standing in a bunker at Point du Hoc. But her culminating activity, the eulogy at Smith’s gravesite, is the one she will always remember.

“I didn’t finish my eulogy until the morning of my presentation. I knew I had to have it right for Capt. Smith and his family. I came to admire and love him throughout this process and he deserved to have a great eulogy,” Stender said.

With PBS cameras rolling and her newly found friends watching, Stender spoke honest and true words about her Silent Hero and afterwards sat at his grave to spend extra time with a man she came to love and respect.

“Mac was just a nice guy, you know,” Stender said. “Reading his words, I found that I really loved his fun loving and easy going nature. He deserved to be recognized and remembered. ”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 5, 2015
by cwadycki
Comments Off on The Road to Student Free Speech in North Dakota

The Road to Student Free Speech in North Dakota

Congratulations to Bismark, North Dakota adviser Sue Skalicky for being the first to submit a Day of Doing project for the summer of 2015!

She produced a two-page spread about the John Wall New Voices Act that was signed into law on April 9.

“We published copies for journalism students. I followed the same requirements as my students. It was time-consuming, but so fun to do! I now have a cool record of one of the highlights of this past school year,” Skalicky said.

Sue Skalicky spread design

October 28, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on 16-page Tabloid from Michigan Advisers

16-page Tabloid from Michigan Advisers

Six Michigan advisers put together a 16-page tabloid with multimedia QR codes. This amazing publication was done in conjunction with the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association. They said the project helped them connect with what they expect students to do. Way to walk the walk!

To see their work, click here.

 

Shari Adwers, Grosse Pointe North
Tracy Anderson, Ann Arbor Community
Kathi Burkholder, Pinckney
Rod Satterthwaite, Grosse Pointe South
Julia Satterthwaite, Rochester
C.E. Sikkenga, Grand Haven

August 4, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on United Way promotional video

United Way promotional video

Albert Dupont
Luling, Louisiana

This is the United Way of St. Charles video for the 2014-15 fundraising campaign. The United Way of St. Charles serves St. Charles Parish in Southeast Louisiana.

August 4, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Student Learns Value of Public Service

Student Learns Value of Public Service

By Nancy A. Olson
Putney, Vermont

Lachlan Francis (submitted)

Lachlan Francis (submitted)

When Lachlan Francis, as a sophomore in a speech and argumentation course at Brattleboro Union High School, began to research the John Collins writing program, he could not have foreseen where his curiosity would lead him.

“As part of my research,” Francis said, “I talked with Ms. (Teri) Appel, who had been my English teacher twice, as well as with other teachers, and I gained an interest in educational policy.”

This interest, and the conversations about policy, continued even after the speech course ended. Eventually, Ms. Appel suggested that Francis consider applying for a student seat on the Vermont state board of education.

In 2000, the Vermont legislature passed a law establishing two seats for high school student members on the state board of education; one student is appointed at the beginning of junior year as a non-voting member. Senior year, that person becomes a voting member, and the governor appoints a new non-voting student.

Isaac Evans-Frantz, BUHS class of 2001, was the first high school student appointed to the state board. In order to initiate the system of rotation, he was appointed as a senior, making him the first high school student in Vermont to be a voting member of the state board, but he served only one year.

With the enthusiastic encouragement of Ms. Appel; Tim Kipp , BUHS social studies teacher at the time, since retired,; and Steve Perrin, BUHS principal. Francis submitted the application, his transcript, letters of recommendation, and a 500-word essay.

After making the first cut, he was among the narrowed field of candidates interviewed by members of the governor’s senior staff.

“The interview lasted about 20 minutes,” Francis said. “I had done a lot of prep, including talking with Ron Stahley (superintendent of Windham Southeast Supervisory Union), who had just won Vermont Superintendent of the Year. BUHS was getting a lot of acclaim because of the collegiate high school program and the career center on campus.”

Francis made a point of discussing his Vermont schooling and the insights he had gained because of it.

“I attended Putney Central School,” Francis continued. “It’s a small elementary school. I saw real dedication. Teachers such as Connie Bresnahan and Mary Anne Deer (both now retired) were always honing their craft. I talked about that experience and about being a student at the high school, a much bigger school, where I also had dedicated teachers, such as Sue Boardman (since retired) and Bob Kramsky. And it probably helped that the governor (Peter Shumlin) is from Putney.”

Although Francis had been told the decision would take up to two weeks, the notice came a day later.

“I got the call from the governor himself,” Francis said. “We talked for 10 or 15 minutes. It was very kind of him. He congratulated me, and we talked about the benefits of being from Putney, of being raised in a village, by a village, and how that translates into a broader sense of public service. It’s part of Vermont’s culture and values.”

At first, Francis felt intimidated at the monthly board meetings.

“Education is full of acronyms,” he said. “I found that daunting. But the board members were incredibly welcoming. I carpooled with Stephan Morse, the chair, and he really mentored me. After a couple of months, I came into my own. Although I don’t have a lot of letters after my name, I’m confident speaking my mind.

“By my second year, I was the fourth most senior member of the board,” he continued. “That created an equality between us because I had more experience than half the other members. At board retreats, we settled in. More than the eight-hour meetings every month, it’s the social events and building relationships that has the bigger impact on how things get done.”

In March 2013, Francis was elected co-vice chair of the board.

“If the Secretary of Education was out of the state, and the chair was absent, I would have run the Agency of Education,” he said. “Although that never happened, I was cc’d on more emails and had more of an inner picture of what was going on.”

Fairly early in his tenure, Francis realized which educational issue was his main focus.

“Education is the key to social and economic mobility,” Francis said. “This is a cultural value we espouse in Vermont and America. That inspired me to take the responsibility seriously.”

The board makes policy, Francis noted, while effective implementation is up to the agency of education and the supervisory unions.

“The work the board did on flexible pathways, dual enrollment (a high school course in which a student can earn both high school and college credit simultaneously), and Personalized Learning Plans (required for grades 7 through 12 in 2015) bears out our goals,” he said. “While I’m painfully aware that these are unfunded mandates, and the board received criticism for requiring the PLP’s in middle school as well as high school, the research shows that in eighth grade, students decide whether or not they will go to college.”

Helping students see themselves as responsible for their own educational direction, Francis explained, makes their education important to them. PLP’s will help teachers and counselors help students “identify what they want to be and provide the scaffolding to help them get there.”

Although Francis expected to bring a student’s point of view to the board, he was surprised at how his views evolved.

“I came to appreciate that students don’t always want what they need,” he said. “Standardized testing, for example. It does have a role as a formative assessment. Taxpayers deserve to know how students are doing. And it has helped us identify the achievement gap and show who is chronically underserved. But it should not be tied to teacher performance or school performance.”

In the fall Francis will attend the University of Vermont as a political science major.  He has also been appointed for a three-year term to the Governor’s Council on Pathways from Poverty.

“By going to UVM, I’ll be able to build the networks I’ve already established,” he said.

This summer Francis is coordinating the political campaign of Becca Balint, who is running in the August primary as a Democratic candidate for Vermont state senate.

“I’ve learned from so many mentors what’s valuable about public service,” he said. “Public service is essential to our democracy.”

August 4, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Fort Dodge Softball

Fort Dodge Softball

By JOHN McBRIDE
Fort Dodge, Iowa

It may not have been as easy as expected, but the Fort Dodge softball team started defense of its CIC Northern Division crown with a doubleheader sweep of Marshalltown at Harlan Rogers Park last night.

The No. 4 (Class 4A) Dodgers won the opener 2-0 and took the nightcap 8-1.

Fort Dodge is now 9-0 for the season and 2-0 in the CIC North. The Bobcats fell to 1-7 and 0-2 but still managed to give the Dodgers everything they wanted.

“We absolutely want to repeat (as CIC champs),” said Adams. “They know people are going to give us everything they have. I was impressed with Marshalltown. Their pitcher threw well against us. Marshalltown definitely came ready to play.”

The Dodgers got solid pitching from Mallory Kilian and Cassie Tjebben, who allowed just five hits combined in the two games.

“Malloy and Cassie did a great job of keeping their composure. Our defense did a great job. We were able to get out of a couple jams,” said Adams.

Kilian allowed just one hit in the opener. She struck out eight and was helped by battery mate Molly Matthes, who threw out two runners at second and by right fielder Bri Ulrich, who threw out a runner at the plate in the third inning.

“That throw from Bri was huge,” said Adams. “And that’s why Molly’s behind the plate for us. I told her they would test her. She’s got such a strong arm, but it’s deceptive.”

Matthes also threw out a runner in the second game.

Senior Maddie Egil gave the Dodgers a 1-0 lead in the second with a lead-off home run. The Dodgers manufactured another run in the third as Lani Van Zyl walked, stole second, reached third on a wild pitch and scored on a sac bunt from Madi Bennett.

The Bobcats kept t things closer thanks to three double plays in the opener.

Marshalltown’s best chance to score was in the third when Maggie Carnahan was thrown out at the plate. The Bobcats also left runners at second in two different innings. Fort Dodge broke open a 1-1 tie in the nightcap with three runs in the third inning. Ulirch walked and scored on a double from Lexi Astor, who was actually thrown out at third trying for a triple.

After Van Zyl walked, Kilian launched a 2-run home run into left for a 4-1 lead.

The Dodgers got four more in the fifth, thanks to four Marshalltown errors. Kilian and Egli each drove in runs. Two others scored on errors.

Tjebben scattered four hits and finished with seven strikeouts. Carnahan drove in Marshalltown’s only run with a double in the second. Tjebben was really never threatened after that. Matthes threw out a runner in the third and the Dodgers turned a double play in the sixth.

Astor had two hits for the Dodgers in the second game. Fort Dodge finished with seven hits in the game.

Fort Dodge will get a big test tonight, taking on No. 1 (4A) Dallas Center-Grimes in a recently-scheduled game tonight in Dallas Center. The freshmen will play at 4:30, followed by JV at 6 and the varsity at 7:30.

August 4, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Fort Dodge Amateur Golf

Fort Dodge Amateur Golf

By JOHN McBRIDE
Fort Dodge, Iowa

Red numbers were in short supply after the first round of the 66th Fort Dodge Amateur at the sun-soaked Fort Dodge Country Club Friday.

Just two golfers in the morning round broke par and another pair broke par in the afternoon rounds. Only one senior division player broke par as well.

After 18 holes, Lakeside Am champion Ryan Kinseth from Fort Dodge leads the field with a three-under 68. He’s followed by a trio that shot two-under 69 – Levi Fink, Ryan Schrimper and Bret Taylor. Fink and Schrimper played in the morning. Kinseth and Taylor went off in the afternoon.

Defending champion Colin Pearson is among a group just three strokes off the pace at even par 71. Also shooting 71 were George Qien and Algona’s Bill Manske. Former Lakeside manager Kevin Ault was at 72 along with Dylan Newweg, Scot Glasford and Connor Peck.

Pat Ryan of Marshalltown led the senior division with a one-under 71. One shot back are Joe Palmer, Tom Kesterson and Scott Morgensen. Defending champ Joel Yunek is three back along with Jim Currell. Kinseth, starting on No. 10, put up a birdie on No. 14, but then took a bogey on No. 1 and 2 after making the turn. He came back strong with and eagle on the par-4 sixth hole and added birdies on Nos. 7 and 9 to finish his round.

“My ball striking was good and I made some putts, but I’d always like to make more,” said Kinseth, who also won the Hampton Open the day before winning at Lakeside. “My swing is feeling really good right now. The course was set up really well. There were some pins you could really go at and some you couldn’t.”

Taylor, a former golf pro from Council Bluffs who regained his amateur status, went off in the second afternoon group. He carded a birdie on No. 14 and Nos. 6 and 7, but made bogey on eight for his two-under.

Schrimper, from Marion, had an interesting card. He made birdies in No. 6, 7 and 9 on the front and No. 15 on the back. He was took a bogey on No. 5 and No. 14.

Fink, who hails from Wadena, also had a chance for a low number. He recorded birdie on six holes, including a string on seven, eight and nine. But he took bogey on No. 1 and No. 4 and a double bogey on No. 14.

Pearson, a 2012 graduate of Fort Dodge Senior High and soon-to-be University of San Diego team member, tied the overall tourney record a year ago with a 14-under par total of 199. He was two-over after making bogey on 15 and 16. He put together three straight birdies to start his second nine and get two one under, but a bogey on No. 7 left him at even par.

“I just wanted to post a good number and stay in contention. That was my goal,” said Pearson. “I had a bogey streak, but finished strong. It’s nice to have (last year’s title) on my resume, but I have to come out and do it all over again.”

Last year, Pearson fired a nine-under 62 on the second day of the tournament to take control.

Ryan had an interesting round as well to his one-under in the senior division. He had six birdies, including five on the back nine alone. But he put up a bogey on No. 4 and 17 and took a double bogey on No. 9.

Yunek, who has won the last two seniors’ titles here and four titles overall, made just one birdie in his round – on No. 16. He had three bogeys.

Kinseth will go off No. 1 at 8:44 this morning. Schrimper and Fink go off in the afternoon and Taylor tees off in the morning.

Ryan takes the senior lead to the No. 1 tee at 9:20. Palmer, from West Des Moines, is the only one among the top four in the senior division that tees off in the afternoon. He goes off No. 1 at 1:24.

The top 32 and ties will make the cut for Sunday’s rounds. The top 16 in the senior division move on to Sunday.

August 1, 2014
by cwadycki
Comments Off on Maddy Barney Photo Essay

Maddy Barney Photo Essay

Here is what Sue Skalicky from Bismark, ND had to say about working on her photo profile of Maddy Barney…

“I am so glad I did it! It was refreshing to get back into interviewing and taking photos. And the writing was like lifting weights after a long break from the gym – that good kind of pain.  I have more empathy for the work I’m requiring of my busy students. But, I also have a renewed passion for working hard on deadline and being proud of the results. This weekend is my leaders’ retreat and I’m excited to show them my work.”

This summer, Maddy Barney, 2012 Century grad, wakes up in Bismarck Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays and drives a taxi for 9 hours. After graduation, Barney moved to Thessaloniki, Greece, to attend her first year of college, because she read a book about it when she was 10. She transferred to an American university in Spain for her second year, and will graduate from from there, but will spend one more semester in Greece spring 2015, because she really misses it. “My soul is there,” Barney said.

This summer, Maddy Barney, 2012 Century grad, wakes up in Bismarck Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays and drives a taxi for 9 hours. After graduation, Barney moved to Thessaloniki, Greece, to attend her first year of college, because she read a book about it when she was 10. She transferred to an American university in Spain for her second year, and will graduate from from there, but will spend one more semester in Greece spring 2015, because she really misses it. “My soul is there,” Barney said.

Barney loves the pace and variety of driving a taxi. “I have such ADD that I can’t do the same thing all the time. This is always changing. There is always this sense of excitement to go get the next passenger and what do they have to say today,” Barney said. She drives the 6 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. shift and ends up transporting a lot of people she sees as those “slipping through the cracks, those who no one has talked to in a month.” During high school, Barney worked at Youthworks and sees a lot of similarities between the two jobs. “[Many of the people I drive] are lonely,” Barney said.  “I believe the biggest heartache is loneliness. It seeps into every inch of somebody. This is Youthworks grown up. It is people who need a person and I love being that person.”

Barney loves the pace and variety of driving a taxi. “I have such ADD that I can’t do the same thing all the time. This is always changing. There is always this sense of excitement to go get the next passenger and what do they have to say today,” Barney said. She drives the 6 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. shift and ends up transporting a lot of people she sees as those “slipping through the cracks, those who no one has talked to in a month.” During high school, Barney worked at Youthworks and sees a lot of similarities between the two jobs. “[Many of the people I drive] are lonely,” Barney said. “I believe the biggest heartache is loneliness. It seeps into every inch of somebody. This is Youthworks grown up. It is people who need a person and I love being that person.”

Barney is prepared for just about everything when she’s on duty at Taxi 9000. With the oil boom in North Dakota, she often drives oil workers. “Some of them are really rude oil guys who get in and say, ‘No one told me you’d be so cute,’ and ‘When can we go out,’” Barney said. “And, I have one regular who has decided that he’s fallen in love with me.” She keeps a log of all her riders and plans to put them in her blog, www.homesweeteverywhere.wordpress.com, at the end of the summer. “You get such tidbits of life. It’s a patchwork, small pieces from everybody, and somehow it becomes your day,” Barney said.

Barney is prepared for just about everything when she’s on duty at Taxi 9000. With the oil boom in North Dakota, she often drives oil workers. “Some of them are really rude oil guys who get in and say, ‘No one told me you’d be so cute,’ and ‘When can we go out,’” Barney said. “And, I have one regular who has decided that he’s fallen in love with me.” She keeps a log of all her riders and plans to put them in her blog, www.homesweeteverywhere.wordpress.com, at the end of the summer. “You get such tidbits of life. It’s a patchwork, small pieces from everybody, and somehow it becomes your day,” Barney said.

t the end of her shift driving taxi, Barney stops by her mom Sarah Murphy’s home to change and see loved ones before heading to her evening job as a waitress. A week ago, Barney had a break from her busy work routine to give a TED talk in Fargo. “It was the most adult thing I’ve ever done,” Barney said. She received an email from those at TED saying they had read her blog and asking if she would give a TED talk speaking at the theme of living on purpose. She simply talked about her life. “I don’t feel like I’m doing anything that significant because it’s just what’s coming natural to me. To me, it’s just very normal,” Barney said.

t the end of her shift driving taxi, Barney stops by her mom Sarah Murphy’s home to change and see loved ones before heading to her evening job as a waitress. A week ago, Barney had a break from her busy work routine to give a TED talk in Fargo. “It was the most adult thing I’ve ever done,” Barney said. She received an email from those at TED saying they had read her blog and asking if she would give a TED talk speaking at the theme of living on purpose. She simply talked about her life. “I don’t feel like I’m doing anything that significant because it’s just what’s coming natural to me. To me, it’s just very normal,” Barney said.

Barney takes a few minutes to eat and catch up with her boyfriend, Cristi Clinciu, whom she met at the The American College of Thessaloniki during her first year of college. Clinciu is from Romania. “He’s just my human,” Barney said. “He’s like the resting place of my soul. Almost like an extension of myself.” Clinciu obtained a work visa to come home with Barney for the summer. He is working at the Hampton Inn as a breakfast host and housekeeping adviser. “He likes it,” Barney said.  “I mean, anyone would like going from making 60 cents an hour to making $10.60 an hour.”

Barney takes a few minutes to eat and catch up with her boyfriend, Cristi Clinciu, whom she met at the The American College of Thessaloniki during her first year of college. Clinciu is from Romania. “He’s just my human,” Barney said. “He’s like the resting place of my soul. Almost like an extension of myself.” Clinciu obtained a work visa to come home with Barney for the summer. He is working at the Hampton Inn as a breakfast host and housekeeping adviser. “He likes it,” Barney said. “I mean, anyone would like going from making 60 cents an hour to making $10.60 an hour.”

Barney changes uniforms as she prepares for her evening shift at the Bistro restaurant in Bismarck. “I love it,” Barney said. “I love that it pays for college. I love that sometimes I walk out with $300.” Barney also loves the simpleness of food. “There is something about food bringing people together,” Barney said. “Watching couples have nothing to say to each other or couples not able to get enough of each other. Or business people putting on this facade of importance. When, at the end of it, we are all just people who need to eat.”

Barney changes uniforms as she prepares for her evening shift at the Bistro restaurant in Bismarck. “I love it,” Barney said. “I love that it pays for college. I love that sometimes I walk out with $300.” Barney also loves the simpleness of food. “There is something about food bringing people together,” Barney said. “Watching couples have nothing to say to each other or couples not able to get enough of each other. Or business people putting on this facade of importance. When, at the end of it, we are all just people who need to eat.”

When not working, Barney and Clinciu enjoy spending time with family and Barney’s friends from high school. However, Barney finds it somewhat of a struggle to come home. After living overseas, Barney finds American culture sometimes difficult to comprehend. “[As wait staff] our job is really just bullshit,” Barney said. “Like someone just paid me $100 to walk food to them. It was nothing. I love tipping culture in America. But, it doesn’t make sense.” Barney loves every day of her life. Although she experienced some apprehension towards the end of her senior year in high school about stepping out in the direction of her dreams, she doesn’t regret any one of her bold steps. To others facing the decisions of what to do after high school, she said, “Plan the things you are going to do purposefully. Don’t go to UND because everyone is going to go to UND. Go to UND, not because it makes the most sense, but because it is what you feel drawn to. You need to take a long time by yourself to figure out why it makes sense to you. A lot of things we accept, but we don’t know why.”

When not working, Barney and Clinciu enjoy spending time with family and Barney’s friends from high school. However, Barney finds it somewhat of a struggle to come home. After living overseas, Barney finds American culture sometimes difficult to comprehend. “[As wait staff] our job is really just bullshit,” Barney said. “Like someone just paid me $100 to walk food to them. It was nothing. I love tipping culture in America. But, it doesn’t make sense.” Barney loves every day of her life. Although she experienced some apprehension towards the end of her senior year in high school about stepping out in the direction of her dreams, she doesn’t regret any one of her bold steps. To others facing the decisions of what to do after high school, she said, “Plan the things you are going to do purposefully. Don’t go to UND because everyone is going to go to UND. Go to UND, not because it makes the most sense, but because it is what you feel drawn to. You need to take a long time by yourself to figure out why it makes sense to you. A lot of things we accept, but we don’t know why.”

This summer is about making money to pay for college and reconnecting with family and friends. But, Barney has an eye on her future and is excited to take the next steps. After college, she would like to spend a year in southeast Asia, a year in Ghana, and a year in Chile. She would maybe like to live in Washington DC and work for National Geographic or New York. “I’m going to marry this Romanian,” Barney said. “It’s so funny, because I never even thought love happened.” Then Barney would like to find her ‘Walden Pond.’ “After it’s been awhile, maybe have some babies around 30,” Barney said, “then I want to bring them somewhere where they can see the stars and play in the water and just make our own soap and have our own big garden.” She wants to continue to live on purpose. “I’m tired of living off the planet in a way that is not for the planet. I’m tired of being handed plastic water bottles and throwing away food. I just want to find a way to get out of this cycle.”

This summer is about making money to pay for college and reconnecting with family and friends. But, Barney has an eye on her future and is excited to take the next steps. After college, she would like to spend a year in southeast Asia, a year in Ghana, and a year in Chile. She would maybe like to live in Washington DC and work for National Geographic or New York. “I’m going to marry this Romanian,” Barney said. “It’s so funny, because I never even thought love happened.” Then Barney would like to find her ‘Walden Pond.’ “After it’s been awhile, maybe have some babies around 30,” Barney said, “then I want to bring them somewhere where they can see the stars and play in the water and just make our own soap and have our own big garden.” She wants to continue to live on purpose. “I’m tired of living off the planet in a way that is not for the planet. I’m tired of being handed plastic water bottles and throwing away food. I just want to find a way to get out of this cycle.”